Kizomba Music History


Kizomba Music History By Eddyvents Kizomba

Kizomba is a style of music originating from Zouk.

Kizomba as a music, is very strong in the most of PALOPS (The Portuguese-speaking African countries are a group of five African countries where the Portuguese language is the official language: Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea Bissau, Mozambique and São Tomé and Príncipe. These countries form part of the Community of Portuguese Language Countries. In Portuguese the group is commonly referred to by the acronym PALOP, a colloquial acronym which means African Countries of Portuguese Official Language (Portuguese: ”Países Africanos de Língua Oficial Portuguesa), also translated as “Portuguese-Speaking African Countries”.)

It is a fusion of zouk with there traditional music.

Angola = Zouk + semba ( Semba is a traditional type of music from the Southern-African country of Angola. Semba is the predecessor to a variety of music styles originated from Africa, of which two of the most famous are Samba (from Brazil) and Kuduro (or Kuduru, energetic, fast-paced Angolan Techno/House music, so to speak). Semba comes from the singular Masemba, meaning “a touch of the bellies”, a move that characterizes the Semba dance.)

Cape Verde = Zouk + Coladera (Coladera is one of Cape Verdean Music, most traditional form the coladeira follows a cycle of fifths. This characteristic is a direct heritage from the morna. Even so, many composers (especially more recent ones) do not always use this structure.

Guinea Bissau = Zouk + Gumbe ( Gumbe is a style of music from Guinea-Bissau. Gumbe is a specific genre that has mostly influenced zouk music (music of the French Caribbean, though the same term also refers to any music of the country). True gumbe is a fusion of several Bissauan folk traditions. Gumbe is the genre most closely associated with Guinea-Bissauan music worldwide.)

Gumbe is a primarily vocal and percussive music that has been associated with nationalist thought since colonial times.

Sao Tome e Principe = Zouk + Puita ( I Don’t have any information till now about this dance, but I’m working on it.lol)

Mocambique = Zouk + Marabenta ( Marrabenta is a form of Mozambican dance music. It was developed in Maputo, the capital city of Mozambique, formerly Lourenço Marques. The name was derived from the Portuguese rebentar (arrabentar in the local vernacular), meaning to break. Marrabenta is influenced by Mozambican and Portuguese folk music and the Western popular music. The earliest marrabenta artists include Fany Pfumo and Dilon Djindji, who started his career in 1939. Marrabenta became popular in 1980s with bands like Eyuphuro and Orchestra Marrabenta Star de Moçambique. The Mozambican band Mabulu mixes rap and marrabenta together.)

In Portugal the word

“Kizomba” often used for any type of music derived from zouk.

Kizomba is known as an African rhythm, developed predominantly

since the late ’80s. It was born in a continent of vibrant

history of music, kizomba is the result of evolution:

a modern and sensual touch-up.

By adding an extremely slow and sensual rhythm kizomba was born.

Kizomba is therefore a combination of rhythms and flavours, a dance full of

warmth and sensuality that presents a real complicity and understanding between

partners.

Dancing Kizomba is considered a unique experience. Closely, partners move in a sensual way where leading and following find a new dimension.

The lyrics are often based on the theme of love and passion. When listening to the sensual rhythm each pair moves smoothly, occasionally causing excitement in the due to suggestive movements. This excitement is taken as normal and assessed as part of the musical experience offered by the unique rhythm

Kizomba encourages revelry.

A dance for two; soft, hot, sensual and contagious which presents a real

complicity between the bodies.

Inside of kizomba we have three diferent styles or levels:

The slow one – Tarraxinha = Zouk + R&B + African rhythm

The Intermedian one – Kizomba = Zouk + African rhythm

The Faster one – Semba ( Semba is a traditional type of music from the Southern-African country of Angola. Semba is the predecessor to a variety of music styles originated from Africa, of which two of the most famous are Samba (from Brazil) and Kuduro (or Kuduru, energetic, fast-paced Angolan Techno/House music, so to speak). Semba comes from the singular Masemba, meaning “a touch of the bellies”, a move that characterizes the Semba dance.)

This is part of my research I have been working on this for years we can go in details after, because for each PALOP Country( The Portuguese-speaking African countries are a group of five African countries where the Portuguese language is the official language: Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea Bissau, Mozambique and São Tomé and Príncipe. Together with Portugal, Brazil and East Timor, these countries form the Community of Portuguese Language Countries. In Portuguese the group of African countries is commonly referred to by PALOP, a colloquial acronym which means African Countries of Portuguese Official Language (Portuguese: Países Africanos de Língua Oficial Portuguesa), also translated as “Portuguese-Speaking African Countries.)Kizomba music and the impact of Zouk was different. But to understand Kizomba better you need to know the history of a Zouk group called Kassav, it was because of their big success and the impact their music have in Africa Kizomba born.

Kassav history

“Kassav” is for African and Caribbean people the same as Beatles was for world, it was literaly because of Kassav we have Kizomba now.

Kassav’ was formed in 1979 by Pierre-Edouard Décimus (a long-time professional musician who had worked with Freddy Marshall) and Paris studio musician Jacob F. Desvarieux. Together, they decided to make Guadeloupean carnival music and record it in a more fully-orchestrated yet modern and polished style. In the 1980s they took Caribbean music to another level by recording in the new digital format.

Kassav’ was the leading band to emerge from the formative years of Zouk; most authors credit Décimus, his brother Georges, the band’s bassist and Desvarieux as its inventors. They gave the style a pan-Caribbean sound by taking elements from Haitian kompa, Dominica Cadence-lypso, Dominican merengue, Nuevo Rican salsa, Trinidadian calypso, Republic of Cameroon’s rhythm Makossa and the result became world-famous. Their first album, Love and Ka Dance (1980), established the new sound of zouk, a Parisian concoction unlike anything else, island-based or otherwise to come onto the global scene. The band gained popularity in their much-heralded live performances in Paris’s Club Zenith and toured widely. For a band ostensibly operating in a “narrowly-focused” Caribbean dance-based ‘recently-arrived’ new genre, their success and influence on other artists was remarkable, although they were most influenced by Vegetable Basket.

Kassav’ continued to gain popularity both as a group and by several members’ solo recordings, eventually peaking in 1985 with Yélélé, which featured the international hit “Zouk la sé sèl médikaman nou ni” (meaning “Zouk is the only medicine we have” in French Antillean Creole). With this hit song, zouk rapidly became a widespread dance craze in Latin America and the Caribbean, and was popular in Europe, Africa, and Asia. Zouk performers became known for wildly theatrical concerts featuring special effects, stage spectacles and colorful costumes. One important contribution of Kassav’ in concert was the appearance of featured dancers on stage with the band; these dancers were in many ways as much a part of the band as any musician. Kassav’ has been noted by its acolytes and aficionados as a dance band par excellence. They appeared with Admiral T, a famous reggae dance hall singer, and many other popular artists. Singer-songwriter/keyboardist Jean-Claude Naimro also appeared with world beat artist Peter Gabriel. Lead vocalist Jocelyne Béroard has also had a number of successes both solo and as a guest with other artists, being the first woman artist in the Caribbean to win certain awards. Kassav’ released another CD in 2007: All U Need is Zouk to substantial acclaim with another successful world tour, so in addition to being the recognized progenitors of zouk (which has become a world-wide dance music phenomenon, notably in Latin America – especially Brazil), nearly 30 years later the same musicians are still arguably its leading exponents.

Originally formed solely of Guadeloupean artists (Decimus; Desvarieux; St Eloi), within a few years Kassav’ also embraced band members of Martinican ancestry (Berouard; Naimro; Marthely); their music is an original danceable Caribbean creole mix that expanded into synthesized sounds after exploring many acoustic timbres, being based fundamentally in a gwo ka rhythmic context especially in earlier recordings. It has been suggested that they did not achieve world-wide success due to the almost total absence of English in their lyrics; instead, they used a very localized version of French Creole unique to Guadeloupe and Martinique, very distinct even from Haitian French Creole. Their choice of language however has not limited their artistic vision,it remains carnival-like and danceable.

 Basement

Angola and its languages

What is Kimbundo and where it comes? North Mbundu, or Kimbundu, one of two Bantu languages called Mbundu, is one of the most widely spoken Bantu languages in Angola, concentrated in the north-west of the country, notably in the Luanda Province, the Bengo Province, the Malanje Province and the Cuanza Norte Province. It is spoken by the Ambundu; (Ambundu is the short form for Akwa Mbundu and ‘Akwa’ means ‘from’, or ‘of’, or more originally ‘originally from’ and ‘belonging to’. In Kimbundu language the particle Akwa is shortened into simply A, so that instead of Akwa Mbndu it becomes Ambundu; similarly the term Akwa Ngola becomes ANgola, then Angola; Ngola was title for kings in Northern Angolan kingdom in the past, before the Portuguese invasion).

There are ten dialects of Kimbundu, Ngola, Dembo, Jinga, Bondo, Bângala, Ibaco, Luanda, Quibala, Libolo, and Quissama. However, this classification is European, not Angolan. There is no way to accurately determine the variations in Kimbundu dialects, because most villages were the language is spoken have not been visited; and there appear to be no experts on this matter considering that Angola lacks professionals capable of providing solid information on this.

During the Portuguese colonial period, a 1919 decree banned the use of local languages in schools and made Portuguese obligatory. This heavily reduced the use of Kimbundu amongst educated and urban populations in favour of Portuguese. On the other hand, Kimbundu was learned by a significant part of the Portuguese population of the region, and many Kimbundu words passed into the everyday Portuguese spoken there. In the 1960s and 1970s, even white and racially mixed musical groups used to sing songs in Kimbundu, e.g. “Monami” and “Kamba iyami”.

In part of the Malanje Province culturally “assimilated” Ambundu populations produced a mix of Kimbundu and Portuguese called Ambaca, whose speakers are called Ambaquistas. ( Note that this information was copy and past from Wikipedia it was just to help us understand more about Angola and is language and because the majority of their songs are in Portuguese and Kimbundo I thought that it would help).

Author: Jay Nandu

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